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I have Toy poodle 7 month old.
He weighs around 2.5 - 3 pounds.

So every time before I pick him up he shivers, tilts, goes around circles.

I would like some advice on how to make him stop that.

Thank you
 

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What do you mean he goes in circles ? Is he trying to get out of your grip ? Some dogs don’t like being picked up very much. My dog, Beckie (blue dog below) is not terribly fond of it so I don’t do it unless I have to or she asks me too (like at the vet).

You can try to make it more fun by giving treats when you pick him up, so he associates being picked up with goodies. After a while you start giving treats less often as the dog has gotten used to it and probably likes it by then.

Also, one important thing to do is respect your dog’s preference and not pick him up unless necessary. Often, we do things to dogs because we, humans, like it. Not the dog.
 

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Was he checked by your vet after bringing him home? Has he done this since the first day or did it start after?

Is there any way you can take a video to show this behavior?
 
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It's always a good idea to have your vet check any new pup and to be seen for a baseline wellness check.
Do you have his vet records from the breeder to get the vaccinations listed in your vet's records?
before I pick him up he shivers, tilts, goes around circles.
I would like some advice on how to make him stop that.
It's necessary to understand why this is happening to know how to help him out of it.
Is this new behavior or has he done this also since you brought him home?
Is there any other behavior/s you have questions about?
Is he otherwise eating, drinking, eliminating, playing, sleeping normally?
 
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Discussion Starter #6
It's always a good idea to have your vet check any new pup and to be seen for a baseline wellness check.
Do you have his vet records from the breeder to get the vaccinations listed in your vet's records?


It's necessary to understand why this is happening to know how to help him out of it.
Is this new behavior or has he done this also since you brought him home?
Is there any other behavior/s you have questions about?
Is he otherwise eating, drinking, eliminating, playing, sleeping normally?
He is like that since I brought him home.
He is eating drinking etc all good.

I have all of his vaccines on papers
 

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Do you have any of his medical records beyond the vaccinations? I may be misremembering but I thought records were going to be provided?
 
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So you’ve only very recently brought him home? Keep in mind that’s a big change at such a sensitive age. He’s still getting comfortable with his new surroundings and family.

What does the breeder have to say about this behaviour? Is he otherwise a happy, healthy, confident, well-socialized poodle?

Regardless, I would get him to your veterinarian right away for a wellness check. That is a good idea any time you bring home a new dog, regardless of his age.
 

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This looks like very anxious, submissive behaviour to me. The lip licking, tucked tail, exposed belly...

Did he behave this way at the breeder’s house? Has he been well-socialized?

I would be going down to his level and letting him come to you. No bending directly over him in a way that can appear threatening or overwhelming, especially while you’re still getting to know each other.

Here’s some more info:

Appeasement/Deference Language
Deference language is designed to appease a perceived threat, avoid injury and is crucial for survival. If the dog engages in non-threatening behavior this helps deescalate the negative intentions of another animal or human. Most appeasement behavior is extremely submissive with the dog lowering the body, making it appear smaller and less threatening. Socially appropriate dogs will respond positively to this deference while others often take advantage of what they perceive as weakness.

  • Head bobbing or lowering
  • Head turning
  • Averting eyes
  • Lip licking
  • Low tail carriage
  • Tail tucked between the legs
  • Curved and lowered body
  • Stomach flip – the dog flips over quickly, exposing his stomach; he is not asking for a belly rub, but signaling that he is withdrawing from interaction
From: Canine Body Language
 

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He's hoping to placate you.

My Remo does a variation on this. When he's unsure or doesn't really want to do something I'm asking, he just rolls onto his back and looks at me, as if to say "I'm very small. I know you won't hurt me."

Good advice from PTP. This is something you can help him with by taking your time and making yourself "small" too. Sit or even lie on the floor til you're near his level. Let him come to you and reward with treats and praise.
Once he's coming to you reliably, still sitting on the floor, let him know what you're going to do and bring him into your lap, still petting and offering treats.

Build slowly on this. It does sound like he needs time but I think he'll come around once he knows he's safe.

He is stinkin' cute :)

Is Max around when Munchen does this? Didn't see him in the video. I don't think it's anything to do with Max, just trying to think how he might be able to help by being a good example.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
He's hoping to placate you.

My Remo does a variation on this. When he's unsure or doesn't really want to do something I'm asking, he just rolls onto his back and looks at me, as if to say "I'm very small. I know you won't hurt me."

Good advice from PTP. This is something you can help him with by taking your time and making yourself "small" too. Sit or even lie on the floor til you're near his level. Let him come to you and reward with treats and praise.
Once he's coming to you reliably, still sitting on the floor, let him know what you're going to do and bring him into your lap, still petting and offering treats.

Build slowly on this. It does sound like he needs time but I think he'll come around once he knows he's safe.

He is stinkin' cute :)

Is Max around when Munchen does this? Didn't see him in the video. I don't think it's anything to do with Max, just trying to think how he might be able to help by being a good example.
Max was sleeping at the time I recorded that video 😉😆😆😆
 

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What a tiny baby! I completely agree with getting down to his level. Sit on the floor and let him come to you, and maybe he will sit in your lap or sit beside you. Once he is relaxed, you might try moving him when he's in your lap, just so that he can kind of get used to having hands around him. But only do this when he's relaxed and comfortable. It's important to know how to read your puppy.

My dogs have not always enjoyed being picked up. I remember a vet remind me that humans can have sharp fingers. Both of my dogs like sitting on the furniture, but one can no longer jump up. He has to accept being picked up for this reason because he won't use stairs, but otherwise he backs away or runs. If you want your dog up on the furniture with you, you might start training him to use dog stairs. Probably safest for his size.

Also, it is always best to take a new dog to the vet even if they come with all their shots. They need to be checked out by someone other than the breeder's vet. Wishing you a happy, healthy puppy!
 

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When I was a kid we had a extra small dog that would do that. Nothing was wrong with it, I think it was excitement and us being so much bigger. If we sat on the floor she would only do it a little.
 
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