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Okay so we are set to bring our little boy home on August 25th. I chose this date based on the knowledge I have of when you’re suppose to bring your puppy home (9-10 weeks). However, my breeder said we could bring him home as early as 6 weeks. This seems VERY early to me and as much as I want to bring him home and officially start our journey together, I’m afraid 6 weeks is far too early. Just wanting to get everyone’s thoughts on this. Thanks!


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OMG no no no. You are right! Stick to your guns and your original plan. 6 weeks is way too soon the bring home any puppy, especially a toy sized one.
 

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OMG no no no. You are right! Stick to your guns and your original plan. 6 weeks is way too soon the bring home any puppy, especially a toy sized one.


Thank you for the reply lily! I want him to be properly socialized and have enough time with his momma! Hope you and your pups are doing well!


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In all honesty, as hard as it may be to do, I would walk away from this puppy/breeder. Any breeder that thinks puppies are ready at 6 weeks old to leave their mother/litter is not a reputable breeder and not only would I be worried about the puppy's health and temperament, but I would not want to support such a bad breeder.
 

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In all honesty, as hard as it may be to do, I would walk away from this puppy/breeder. Any breeder that thinks puppies are ready at 6 weeks old to leave their mother/litter is not a reputable breeder and not only would I be worried about the puppy's health and temperament, but I would not want to support such a bad breeder.
I was going to say something similar. Bringing home a toy at 6 weeks is very dangerous, as they can easily lose weight and suffer hypoglycemia, which can rapidly lead to death.

This person obviously only cares about money and you could face a lifetime of potential problems if you get one of her dogs. Reputable breeders often don’t let toys go before 12 weeks old.
 

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Absolutely agree with everything that has already been said. I am shocked that any breeder would offer this, but a toy breeder especially!
 

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I know you are probably dishearten and upset but the responses here on PF. I agree, no quality breeder of tpoos would offer you a puppy at 6 weeks. That's irresponsible behavior.
 

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I'm stunned. He's a beautiful little guy and I've seen his pic and enjoyed reading about your enthusiasm, but... For breeders with a clue, they do not sell or give away their pups before the age of 8 weeks.

I'll first address this: It is necessary for canine-to-canine socialization. The mother has things to teach it, and ideally it will have litter mates. Combined together, the puppy will learn about dog-to-dog manners, language, play, and hierarchy. Twelve weeks is even better. In the real world, however, most go to their forever home at 8 to 10 weeks because taking care of and cleaning up after a litter is a lot of work.

For toy poodles and toy breeds, they often need longer than 8 weeks until they've hit the 2-lb mark. Because they were bred to be so small, their systems tend to be immature and have difficulty regulating sugar. Thus they are prone to hypoglycemia, even at 2-lbs. Toy breeds are at risk for this until about 4 months. Keep a tube of Nutri-Cal on hand even if you get him after 8 weeks. See video below.

I brought home mine at 10-1/2 weeks, the breeder was ready to let her go at 8 weeks. I asked that she stay longer for the socialization, and the breeder said fine. I saw Bella get her last mother's milk when I picked her up; by then she was on kibble and mom's milk. But at 11 weeks, she had a hypoglycemic episode which would have killed her if I had waited overnight "to see if she was better". Thank God I followed my hunch and the vet was still open.

One other thing: has the breeder done any DNA testing on the parents? My guess is no, but if your heart is set on this puppy, you have time before you buy to order the $98 Poodle Disease Panel from here. You swab cheeks, send it back, and this OFA approved lab emails the results. It will tell you if the pup is clear, a carrier, or will have dreaded genes from each parent that will lead to blindness, etc.

 

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I know my original reply here did not address the concerns about the quality of this breeder's work, but I agree with the posts here that do so. I actually was pretty startled when I came to realize that the original pictures of the puppy were from a visit made when the litter was only three weeks old. I've never spoken with a breeder who allowed visits before five weeks since before then it can be upsetting to the mom's to have strangers around.
 
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I'll chime in here to agree with everybody else--that's WAAAAY too early to let any pup go, especially a toy breed. That also raises huge red flags about the breeder.

Please let us help you find a responsible breeder.
 

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PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE take everyone's advice here! It is sound and true!!!
 
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Hi

No one wants to rain on your puppy parade. We all love our pups and want the best for everyone when getting a new family member.

The breeder's knowledge, motives for breeding, and experience do seem questionable. I haven't looked back thru your other posts about Onyx to see if anything else about the breeder was mentioned. Making sure that only healthy dogs are bred is one of the first responsibilities of a quality breeder.

Does the breeder do documented and verifiable health/DNA testing of the parents for the known poodle issues? Have they provided you access or copies of that info? What kind of health guarantee are they offering? How long have they been breeding poodles? This is something to consider strongly, as health care costs can become a real issue, and if known issues can be ruled out, that's like insurance for you and quality of life for Onyx.

Another responsibility of a quality breeder is to make sure they send puppies to their new home with the very best possible start in life. That means at a minimum good food, socialization, maybe some training. The hope is that the love of the dogs and the love of the breed is their highest priority in breeding pups and helping them to their new homes.

If you don't feel that you can or want to back away from Onyx, that is understandable. You're already invested. Please understand that it is care and concern that brings the advice to reconsider. If you decide to proceed, be aware of the potential issues and be prepared to deal with them. The breeder won't necessarily have your back. Without guarantees and a good reputation to back them up, you're in the same position as if he's a rescue.

If you proceed, nothing that might happen will change how you feel about Onyx, but you will be able to be prepared. And since no one knows what's going to happen in the future, know that no one here wishes anything but good for you and little Onyx.
 

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Rose n Poos, please listen. This must feel heartbreaking to you. Even if you have put down a big deposit this is the wrong thing to do. I was so lucky, my excellent breeder kept my spoo until he was 13 weeks. He is now my service dog, and above and beyond what I have ever seen any other spoo do in that regard.

We would so hate to see you having problems. After getting a puppy one would have to be cold indeed to ever be able to return it. Please do not take it.

It sounds to me like the breeder is a backyard breeder. She is tired of all of the work it takes to give them a good start. It is a lot of work indeed! I would ask for proven health history and tests back 3 generations. That was my criteria and I am so glad I stuck to it.

If she can give that to you, I would at minimum ask her to keep the little one with the mother until about 12 weeks. Do you live close enough that you could go over every couple of days to monitor how things are going, how the puppy is doing, how he is being treated, how he acts around the other dogs and people?

Please listen to the people here with lots of experience. My best to you.
 

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For toy poodles and toy breeds, they often need longer than 8 weeks until they've hit the 2-lb mark. Because they were bred to be so small, their systems tend to be immature and have difficulty regulating sugar. Thus they are prone to hypoglycemia, even at 2-lbs. Toy breeds are at risk for this until about 4 months. Keep a tube of Nutri-Cal on hand even if you get him after 8 weeks.
Definitely watch this video.

I would find out how much your puppy currently weighs. I think 2 pounds is even too small. When I got Jasper, he was 2.8 pounds. The breeder warned me about hypoglycemia, but you also have to be very careful about your tiny puppy's body temperature. I brought Jasper into the vet his first week of living with me because he was acting sick, and sure enough I was told he needed to have a hot water bottle near at all times him until he was around the 4 pound mark. I was told he would have died had I not brought him in immediately. If you bring your puppy home at such a low weight, please be prepared to constantly monitor the puppy's health.
 

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What is disturbing me here is that you are not answering. I hope that means you have backed away from this. Please tell us what is happening.
 

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kontiki, rose n poos wasn't the person who was getting the puppy. There seems to have been a bit of a crossed wire on that. The OP hasn't replied at all and perhaps that is because we scared them off. I also hope they changed their minds, but if they aren't logging in and looking at PF we won't know. It is sort of like my life with my students I have them for 15 weeks then they move on. I usually don't know anything about what transpires as they move through life. They are busy adults.
 

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I agree with lilycd, we may have frightened the original poster away though I hope not. Its kind of hard to give up a puppy that you already have seen and have a deposit on. I'm not so sure I could. Getting a young puppy isn't necessarily a sentence to bad health or behavior. While it isn't recommended, years ago I have had very young dogs given to me, one being just over 5 weeks. One was a black lab that my kids grew up with. That dog actually turned out to be one of the best dogs in every way that I ever owned. So who knows.
 
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