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I have a 6 month old male mini who is still peeing in the house. He never poops indoors and We take him out every hour and he gets lots of excersic. He does drink a lot of water. I had the vet check him for a UTI and diabetes but he was negative. We hot him at 9 weeks and this has been an ongoing problem. Today he had two accidents in the house. He never poops indoors. We can be playing or he may have just come in from a walk and just squats and pees with no warning. This is our 7th dog but first small dog and we have never had this issue before. Our standards were both housebroken in less than a week. He can sleep 8 hours at night without peeing in his crate but daytime he seems to have no control. We have never reprimanded him but I am starting to think we will have too. He is completely fearless and even a tap on the nose means “game on” and he starts playing. We are at the end of our patience and don’t know what to do with him. With Covid19 I can’t take him to a trainer for at least another month but am getting so tired of cleaning floors and carpets.
Any help would be appreciated.
 

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It sounds like he just thinks that's what he's supposed to do. Reprimanding him will only teach him to hide his pees from you, which would be a nigtmare. So resist all urge to do this.

Dog are predictable in that they will always try do what results in the best possible outcome for them. Some things to consider:

Are you have potty parties each and every time he pees outside? I mean immediately after, not once you're back indoors?

If he doesn't potty in his designated toilet area, does he go straight back into confinement for 30 minutes and then back out again to the same spot? Repeating as necessary?

And is he confined or tethered to you at all times when you're inside? If a puppy isn't potty trained, he should have extremely limited access to anywhere other than his personal space and his toilet area. For us, this meant having a pen indoors so Peggy understood that was her place to keep clean. We very slowly expanded her access to additional living space, but for months still kept doors to all other rooms closed. And we continued this long after she was reliably housetrained.

The reason for this is that accidents are ours, not the puppy's. And every accident reinforces undesirable behaviour, so we want to avoid them at all costs.

Remember, too, that he's only now reaching the point where his body can physically hold urine on command.
 

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It sounds like he just thinks that's what he's supposed to do. Reprimanding him will only teach him to hide his pees from you, which would be a nigtmare. So resist all urge to do this.

Dog are predictable in that they will always try do what results in the best possible outcome for them. Some things to consider:

Are you have potty parties each and every time he pees outside? I mean immediately after, not once you're back indoors?

If he doesn't potty in his designated toilet area, does he go straight back into confinement for 30 minutes and then back out again to the same spot? Repeating as necessary?

And is he confined or tethered to you at all times when you're inside? If a puppy isn't potty trained, he should have extremely limited access to anywhere other than his personal space and his toilet area. For us, this meant having a pen indoors so Peggy understood that was her place to keep clean. We very slowly expanded her access to additional living space, but for months still kept doors to all other rooms closed. And we continued this long after she was reliably housetrained.

The reason for this is that accidents are ours, not the puppy's. And every accident reinforces undesirable behaviour, so we want to avoid them at all costs.

Remember, too, that he's only now reaching the point where his body can physically hold urine on command.
Thanks for the suggestions. He always goes every time we take him outside and immediately gets a treat and praise. Our house is very open concept so confining him means keeping him in the den which is the only room with a door. we try to spend as much time as possible in that room and sometimes he will sit by the door and look at us. We take him out right away and he goes but when we come in and let him in the kitchen to eat and drink he will start racing around the house and we have to chase him to put him back in the den but somehow he manages to pee again before we can grab him. He holds it all night so this is what bewilders us. If we tether him he climbs our legs and humps or bites us. He gets lots of time outs in his cage for biting and just to give us a break. Our 2 standards and even our 4 afghans were reliably trained by 4 months. We just have the mini now and he has all of our attention 24/7. This puppy is full of energy and has not slept during the day since we got him. He destroys all plush toys and gets bored with chew toys quickly preferring to interact with us. He can sit, down, shake paws, rollover etc. so is a smart little guy. We just can’t understand how he can pee so often and why he isn’t getting the message after 4 months of positive training. i haven’t seen posts from other mini owners with this problem.
 

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Check out this thread. Her dog is older but similar problem and the advice she was given might be useful to you.

 

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Check out this thread. Her dog is older but similar problem and the advice she was given might be useful to you.

Thanks Dechi. I read the entire thread and will check Ian Dunbar’s training method. I am having no problems with pooping inside. It is just the peeing. I am going to restrict the amount of water he drinks and check amazon for belly bands. It seems like peeing outside every hour should keep him from peeing inside but it doesn’t. He is walked about 4 miles a day but never tires. Both our standards were very well behaved but this mini is just full of mischief all the time. I think sometimes the peeing is because he has the “crazies” so often and the excitement makes him pee. He has even peed while I was holding him. After 6 other dogs I thought I knew what I was doing but with this one I’m lost.
 

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Also be aware that before 6 months no puppy can be guaranteed "housebroken" in the truest sense of the concept. Your previous dogs clearly understood urinating was not acceptable and had been taught or actually perhaps had shown you their need to potty signs reliably enough that you got them out the door in time.

Rather nearly all smart pups will understand the concept and can be trained or help you to learn when they need to relieve themselvs

It sounds like this pup has no clear warning signs on his feeling urgency. I suggest you largely go back to the very beginning on potty training. It sould go quickly once your pup understands that in the house is not acceptable and get some signals straightened out with him. You will have to be very vigilant on heeding the signs. Javelin never had in the house "accidents." I was home a lot and knew that his sign was standing quietly near the back door. In other words if he was loose and out of sight there would have been high probability of him getting desperate enough to relive himself wherever he happened to be. I made sure that didn't happen by either crating him or making sure I could see him. He made a couple of mistakes indoors at places other than home, like he peed on an end cap in a big box pet store, but I think that was probably a really tempting well marked target for him (he was just starting to lift his leg). I gnerally think puppies make mistakes and that training lapses are accidents that are on us to own.
 
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Good advice here. Just please do not restrict water! Your puppy doesn't have a water problem. It sounds like he needs a little more structure to his play and exercise (including good mental exercise) and then some dedicated time to learn how to settle. At 10 months, Peggy is still rewarded for settling.

Hearing your puppy never sleeps during the day worries me a bit, as puppies need this downtime for their development (and sanity). Peggy definitely didn't enforce her own nap schedule at that time, so we did it for her using a covered crate. The crazier she was acting, the faster she'd crash!

And yes, back to housebreaking basics. He'll get it. :)

Your other dogs may have been housebroken more easily because of the foundation they received from their breeder. Who knows? All dogs are different. But I'm sure your mini is going to surprise you in other ways. He sounds like a fun boy.

(P.S. Would love to know puppy's name and see some photos!)
 

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Also be aware that before 6 months no puppy can be guaranteed "housebroken" in the truest sense of the concept. Your previous dogs clearly understood urinating was not acceptable and had been taught or actually perhaps had shown you their need to potty signs reliably enough that you got them out the door in time.

Rather nearly all smart pups will understand the concept and can be trained or help you to learn when they need to relieve themselvs

It sounds like this pup has no clear warning signs on his feeling urgency. I suggest you largely go back to the very beginning on potty training. It sould go quickly once your pup understands that in the house is not acceptable and get some signals straightened out with him. You will have to be very vigilant on heeding the signs. Javelin never had in the house "accidents." I was home a lot and knew that his sign was standing quietly near the back door. In other words if he was loose and out of sight there would have been high probability of him getting desperate enough to relive himself wherever he happened to be. I made sure that didn't happen by either crating him or making sure I could see him. He made a couple of mistakes indoors at places other than home, like he peed on an end cap in a big box pet store, but I think that was probably a really tempting well marked target for him (he was just starting to lift his leg). I gnerally think puppies make mistakes and that training lapses are accidents that are on us to own.
Also be aware that before 6 months no puppy can be guaranteed "housebroken" in the truest sense of the concept. Your previous dogs clearly understood urinating was not acceptable and had been taught or actually perhaps had shown you their need to potty signs reliably enough that you got them out the door in time.

Rather nearly all smart pups will understand the concept and can be trained or help you to learn when they need to relieve themselvs

It sounds like this pup has no clear warning signs on his feeling urgency. I suggest you largely go back to the very beginning on potty training. It sould go quickly once your pup understands that in the house is not acceptable and get some signals straightened out with him. You will have to be very vigilant on heeding the signs. Javelin never had in the house "accidents." I was home a lot and knew that his sign was standing quietly near the back door. In other words if he was loose and out of sight there would have been high probability of him getting desperate enough to relive himself wherever he happened to be. I made sure that didn't happen by either crating him or making sure I could see him. He made a couple of mistakes indoors at places other than home, like he peed on an end cap in a big box pet store, but I think that was probably a really tempting well marked target for him (he was just starting to lift his leg). I gnerally think puppies make mistakes and that training lapses are accidents that are on us to own.
Thanks for your reply. Perhaps you are right and he doesn’t feel the urge in time. That’s why I had the vet check him for diabetes or a UTI. He understands that he should go outside because he goes very quickly and then pulls to go back inside. He just isn’t getting the part that going inside is bad.
 

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Another thought... he is a boy and 6 months old. Has he started to try lifting his leg? You may find he gets much better as he starts maturing. I know mine started to view pee as a precious resource best saved for strategic places. Which definitely did not include inside the house.
 

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Good advice here. Just please do not restrict water! Your puppy doesn't have a water problem. It sounds like he needs a little more structure to his play and exercise (including good mental exercise) and then some dedicated time to learn how to settle. At 10 months, Peggy is still rewarded for settling.

Hearing your puppy never sleeps during the day worries me a bit, as puppies need this downtime for their development (and sanity). Peggy definitely didn't enforce her own nap schedule at that time, so we did it for her using a covered crate. The crazier she was acting, the faster she'd crash!

And yes, back to housebreaking basics. He'll get it. :)

Your other dogs may have been housebroken more easily because of the foundation they received from their breeder. Who knows? All dogs are different. But I'm sure your mini is going to surprise you in other ways. He sounds like a fun boy.

(P.S. Would love to know puppy's name and see some photos!)
My puppy’s name is Tyler and that is him in my profile picture. I’m new to this forum so if I figure out how to post pics I will. He is adorable and was purchased from a very good breeder here in Ontario, Canada. He was from a litter of two and likely bullied his brother because when he plays with my friend’s 10 month old Aussiedoodle which is twice his size, my friend has to rescue her dog because Tyler is so aggressive and never gets tired. That may be why he thinks he’s the alpha dog with my husband and I.
i had never considered caging him to settle him down. We have just walked him longer and played more to try wearing him down. He likes both his big crate in the bedroom for nights and his wire crate in the den for time outs. He never whines or cries to get out so you may be on to something with forcing him to nap and settle. He really gets wound up and stays that way most of the time and then the accidents happen. His playtime is all day. His mental stimulation is learning obedience and tricks but he is VERY treat motivated and will not do anything without a reward. He drinks a lot of water, maybe because he’s so active.
I will start the caging to settle him immediately.
Thank you.
 

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Another thought... he is a boy and 6 months old. Has he started to try lifting his leg? You may find he gets much better as he starts maturing. I know mine started to view pee as a precious resource best saved for strategic places. Which definitely did not include inside the house.
No leg lifting yet. He squats very low and is so fluffy it is hard to tell that he’s actually peeing.
i hope you are right. He usually only pees once on our walks and I remember our other males behaving like your dog.
Thanks for replying.
 

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Ahhhh! Okay, that makes lots of sense. At that age, when he gets worked up, it's time for a nap. Think of him like a toddler. You don't take a cranky or over-excited toddler out for a jog! You soothe him and put him down for a nap.

It can seem counterintuitive, I know. But you will create a little adrenaline junkie if you keep piling on the exercise. And his little brain will be perpetually fried, which isn't a good state for learning.

If you've never crate trained him and didn't plan to, a mat or bed can work, too. But this will be new for him and might take some time.

Here's a good overview:


You can also research "capturing calm."

For Peggy, we like an indoor exercise pen/crate combo. Her pen is attached to her crate, and she's learned to relax in both. The pen was also invaluable for potty training.
 

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Should add: Your puppy is likely not aggressive. He's over-tired and over-excited, yes. He can't think straight. And also, he's from a very small litter, so may not have learned good doggy manners during those important early days. So be patient with him, but take this seriously.

As I do with so many folks here, I strongly recommend reading this from beginning to end:


I think you'll find that all the issues you're presently seeing are interconnected. So you'll want to take a more holistic approach, rather than treating "the symptoms."
 

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Should add: Your puppy is likely not aggressive. He's over-tired and over-excited, yes. He can't think straight. And also, he's from a very small litter, so may not have learned good doggy manners during those important early days. So be patient with him, but take this seriously.

As I do with so many folks here, I strongly recommend reading this from beginning to end:


I think you'll find that all the issues you're presently seeing are interconnected. So you'll want to take a more holistic approach, rather than treating "the symptoms."
Thank you for the link. I will read the book. The cover made us laugh because the dog in the centre with his mouth open and fangs showing reminded us both of Tyler at 9 weeks!
 

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I second that you should not restrict his water intake. Dogs are good at properly regulating their water intake, in fact most don’t drink quite enough. Water is more important than food and dehydration happens quickly.
My mini wasn’t housebroken until around 6 months. But she also was kept in her ex pen/crate set up most of the day except for periods of play where she was only in my living room under my watchful eye. She only got more time out of the pen as she proved she wouldn’t pee. If she had an accident, I had her “start over again” and decreased the amount of time she was allowed out of the pen, while increasing how often i took her out. Since she didn’t have opportunities to have accidents, it didn’t become a regular habit. It might take Tyler a bit longer to be housebroken since he’s made a bit of a habit of peeing in the house, but he’ll learn!
 

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Thanks for the suggestions. He always goes every time we take him outside and immediately gets a treat and praise. Our house is very open concept so confining him means keeping him in the den which is the only room with a door. we try to spend as much time as possible in that room and sometimes he will sit by the door and look at us. We take him out right away and he goes but when we come in and let him in the kitchen to eat and drink he will start racing around the house and we have to chase him to put him back in the den but somehow he manages to pee again before we can grab him. He holds it all night so this is what bewilders us. If we tether him he climbs our legs and humps or bites us. He gets lots of time outs in his cage for biting and just to give us a break. Our 2 standards and even our 4 afghans were reliably trained by 4 months. We just have the mini now and he has all of our attention 24/7. This puppy is full of energy and has not slept during the day since we got him. He destroys all plush toys and gets bored with chew toys quickly preferring to interact with us. He can sit, down, shake paws, rollover etc. so is a smart little guy. We just can’t understand how he can pee so often and why he isn’t getting the message after 4 months of positive training. i haven’t seen posts from other mini owners with this problem.
Crate him, take him out to potty, crate him. If you take him out to play, take him to a different are as OUTSIDE and carry him out. To bring him back in carry him. Use his pen to to feed and water him or a large rabbit water bottle on the door of the crate during the day. He won't want to potty in his bed, so he'll begin to let you know he wants out and make sure to take him straight to his potty area and constantly urging him by saying something like go potty in a happy voice, praising when he does.
 

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I'd definitely look into enforced and regular rest times. These pups can get so overwound and don't even know how tired they are.

Did I read right, that on top of the going outside once an hour and the other play and exercise times, he's being walked 4 miles daily?

I expect to get corrected if I'm not right but I think that's way too much for a mini at this age. It's actually not good for him, physically or mentally. I'm guessing has become an adrenaline junkie.

I'm wondering if there might be a physical connection between too much exercise changing his urinary system workings, not to mention the possible increase in thirst which leads to...

If I missed it being mentioned, look into Brain Games, mentally stimulating play (training, but don't tell him lol). Poodles love figuring things out and the mental exercise is equally important to their whole being.



Tyler is adorable! There's a couple of ways to post a picture. If it's one on your computer, just select the Insert Picture icon below the Reply box


466105




then select from your files by clicking in this box

466106

Or you can just go to your files (or any picture on the internet) and copy and paste it in

466107



You'll get this! He is so darn cute!
 

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Is there a daily schedule you follow for him? Puppies need routine to help them learn what to do when.

I'm also trying to think if there might be some other medical condition to consider tho I still lean to overstimulation and possibly a slower maturity rate for control of his urinary system while active.
 

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I second that you should not restrict his water intake. Dogs are good at properly regulating their water intake, in fact most don’t drink quite enough. Water is more important than food and dehydration happens quickly.
My mini wasn’t housebroken until around 6 months. But she also was kept in her ex pen/crate set up most of the day except for periods of play where she was only in my living room under my watchful eye. She only got more time out of the pen as she proved she wouldn’t pee. If she had an accident, I had her “start over again” and decreased the amount of time she was allowed out of the pen, while increasing how often i took her out. Since she didn’t have opportunities to have accidents, it didn’t become a regular habit. It might take Tyler a bit longer to be housebroken since he’s made a bit of a habit of peeing in the house, but he’ll learn!
I have started crating him for an hour in the morning and an hour in the afternoon or whenever he gets really crazy. We are making him sit or lie down for treats when he gets over excited. We have had 2 accident free days so 🤞 Thanks for your support.
 
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