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Hello, today my six month old toy poodle (4.2 lbs) got dropped accidentally by a friend. It wasn’t a negligent drop, but probably a foot or foot and a half from the ground. She started crying with extreme extreme pain and I’ll cut to the chase she has a broken front leg.
Luckily I was able to get her into a vet clinic on the same day. They suggested a surgery through a different clinic which would cost ballpark $6000. I asked what the other options were which were either amputation or splinting which would require multiple re-splinting of the leg for the next 6 to 8 weeks which at the end may or may not work. I was told there’s about a 25% chance that she’ll be able to keep her leg after the splinting if it works. And after that time if the splint doesn’t work it’s too late to do the surgery. The splinting all in all will cost ballpark in total 1000 to 1500. And amputation will cost about 2000.
I am looking into the option of taking her to a less expensive area to a vet which might be able to do the surgery or the amputation for less money. This is my first pet and I can’t believe this is the reality of pet ownership. I guess I sound sort of naïve but I’m still trying to wrap my head around it. My daughter is super super super super attached to the dog and wants me to pay whatever in order to keep the leg and hopefully to get surgery. I am just trying to be realistic about this though and I wanted to get anyone’s take on the situation. I just feel like I won’t be able to keep spending this kind of money as I can’t afford it but at the same time it would break my daughters heart to not get the best kind of care for our dog so I just feel like I’m between a rock and a hard place and wondering if I should just buck up, get carecredit and do the surgery or stay the course with the splint and pray for healing. Thanks for reading.
 

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That is a very unlucky and hard situation. My puppy was dropped by a negligent friend of friend at 10 weeks and was fine, though I was livid of course. I guess toys have more fragile bones and are prone to injury. It is hard to give advice given that everybody is in a different financial situation. Personally I also could not immediately fork over $6k, but I would still be opting for the surgery with highest chance of success and offering best quality of life. But I don't have other major commitments in my life. I got insurance on my puppy almost immediately when I got him because I knew a lot of things like this can happen. Swallowing a foreign object, dog attack, hit by car, parvo, eating something poisonous, luxating patella... all are multiple thousands of dollars to treat. If I didn't have the insurance I'd be using care credit.

But again, it is a highly personal decision.

You may check with any local vet schools to see if they may offer a reduced price.
 

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Get the CareCredit and the surgery for your dog. Your dog and your daughter are depending on you. Your daughter will never forget this if you do not provide the proper care for her, and the dog became your responsibility when you brought her home.

It is unfortunate that in life we occasionally make decisions that have consequences we didn't foresee. I think we can all relate to having made an uninformed decision- likely more than one! Having a dog as part of the family is not cheap. Maybe you really can't afford a dog? If this is true be prepared to give the dog up to a rescue group who will provide the surgery for her and rehome her to a family who can afford the costs of dog ownership. If you think this is the right direction for your family and dog, let us know your general geographic location and we can recommend a rescue organization who will do right by your dog.

I know this is a bit of a tough response. My very best wishes to you, your dog, and your daughter. I know you will find your way.
 

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I'm very sorry to be meeting under these circumstances.

Raindrops and Newport have given different options, all valuable for you. I agree in this, when you take on the responsibility, you take it all on. I couldn't not do my utmost to give my pups the best chance of the best life. This isn't meant to be judgmental, more a reality check.

I have some questions. I'd expect x-rays were taken, did they show you those? Was she seen by an orthopedic specialist? If not, even if she was, I'd definitely spend the price of that consultation/second opinion for the most trained assessment of her condition. And find a specialist not associated with the clinic you've been to, This is to get a totally unbiased second opinion, no reflection on the clinic you went to. I'm also assuming they gave you meds for her pain.

Carecredit is helpful. Teaching universities are an excellent option. Please stay in touch. Sending hope to you all.
 

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Wow $6000. for surgery is a lot. I would shop around and as mentioned teaching universities often do vet and orthodox work for much less. I would look into that option.
 

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You can shop a bit, but every day that goes by means less likelihood of success because things will heal up with scar tissue. These things are sadly part of pet ownership. The purchase price of a puppy can easily be a small part of that baby's life expenses. I say go with CareCredit.
 

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Related, many years ago I had a cat who ended up with a luxated patella (initially a sublux). We tried a crate rest approach and she improved greatly until she ended up wrestling her sister and everything came undone. It was a complicated fix since it was delayed a bit. Thankfully I was able to substitute teaching to pay myself back the expense (which might have been a bit less if done right away after the injury occurred rather than several weeks later). Now we have a large dedicated emergency fund and/or could do CareCredit for vet emergencies.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for the responses. Yeah there are two components of the fracture. I did get x-rays done but I didn’t talk directly to the doctor nor did I get the records or paperwork but I did have them sent to a another vet who he’s touching base with the board-certified surgeon in a town about an hour away that would be less expensive.I’m not sure if there are teaching hospitals in my area. If anyone knows of any in/around Portland Oregon let me know. Yes I do understand that time is of the essence. I also know that yesterday when I was calling around, The surgeon would not of been able to do it until two days. So I feel like I am doing the right thing and she has her pain medications and is comfortable I hope.
 

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There is a vet school at OSU in Corvallis.
 
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Thank you so much for all the comments and support. Yes, I saw OSU and put a call in. That said, I got info back from a Board Certified orthopedic surgeon that looked that has looked at the records/xrays and he said: "Honestly, that's a fracture that could heal just fine with an appropriately placed splint or cast. The fracture does not appear to be displaced and the ulna is almost intact. So that's what I'd go for." I am feeling good that we are on the right course for healing. Now, I need to figure out the best care for her to give the best chance of full recovery.
 

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Thank you so much for all the comments and support. Yes, I saw OSU and put a call in. That said, I got info back from a Board Certified orthopedic surgeon that looked that has looked at the records/xrays and he said: "Honestly, that's a fracture that could heal just fine with an appropriately placed splint or cast. The fracture does not appear to be displaced and the ulna is almost intact. So that's what I'd go for." I am feeling good that we are on the right course for healing. Now, I need to figure out the best care for her to give the best chance of full recovery.
Awesome news.
 

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That is good news. I wish you great success in getting good healing and that there is a non-surgical plan. 2nd opinions when you can get them can be so insightful of many things as Johanna noted.
 

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This sounds like good reason to hope for a great outcome!

With this hopeful news in hand, I'll broach the subject of insurance for your little poodle.

When folks aren't in a position to have those kinds of funds in an emergency account, you'll see it recommended many times in the forum to look into insurance, especially for the first year or two. Prices are quite reasonable compared to even a single ER visit. This might allow you some time to build up some funds, if it should come to that again.

A search thru the forum will give you some personal experiences and possibly recommendations.

Wishing the best for you all!
 

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The only warning I have for you is that, crate rest is important your pup even casted can reinjured the leg easily no running no playing only out to potty so the leg can heal, my my mom's yorkie had surgery on his leg to repair it and he ended reinjuring the leg and eventually came to stay with me I was dogless at the time. So enforced rest is very important
 

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The only warning I have for you is that, crate rest is important your pup even casted can reinjured the leg easily no running no playing only out to potty so the leg can heal, my my mom's yorkie had surgery on his leg to repair it and he ended reinjuring the leg and eventually came to stay with me I was dogless at the time. So enforced rest is very important
This is why we went with an FHO when Gracie dislocated her hip. We were told that setting the joint would require up to 6 weeks of crate rest, at which point it might just pop out again. Eek. Hard enough to keep a senior calm. Very tricky with a puppy.

Do keep us posted, Chlo. Would love to see pics of your puppy, too. We're invested now. :)
 

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First of all, I am so glad that this injury wasn’t so dire or expensive. It’s a hard road keeping a naturally exuberant puppy from running and jumping. Best wishes on a compliant pup, and I know I’m dreaming, so hugs!
 
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