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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Our poodle is about 16 weeks old and male. I basically have a house full of kids but mostly am having some issues with my 2 year old daughter and occasionally my 5 year old son being and playing near the dog. Basically there are many times when they are trying to quietly play or sit on a couch/chair and the puppy just seems to “react” to them, like jumping up near them, mouthing at them. I have no clue how to deal with this other than putting him in his pen. Is it going to get worse?is it dangerous? What the heck can I do about it? Thanks
 

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Our poodle is about 16 weeks old and male. I basically have a house full of kids but mostly am having some issues with my 2 year old daughter and occasionally my 5 year old son being and playing near the dog. Basically there are many times when they are trying to quietly play or sit on a couch/chair and the puppy just seems to “react” to them, like jumping up near them, mouthing at them. I have no clue how to deal with this other than putting him in his pen. Is it going to get worse?is it dangerous? What the heck can I do about it? Thanks
Young children and puppies should never be unsupervised. Yes, your puppy could inadvertently hurt a kid, just by nipping or jumping.

Use the tethering technique. Have your puppy tethered on a leash to you when you can’t watch it. Or tie his leash next to you. When you really can’t do either, put him in his crate. Just be careful, being in the crate can’t be punishment. It has to be a nice place that he likes.

Anyhow, at 4 months a puppy should never be unsupervised, because they are not housebroken and will soil in the house if you let them.

Puppies and young children are hard work and need constant, and I mean constant, supervision.
 

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Yes I always “supervise” but he still goes after them when I’m there supervising. Then he runs away from me because he knows I’m about to put him in the pen.
 

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I have a 6.5 month old puppy and an almost 7 year old at the moment. My son doesn't believe in quiet time (lol) but has your puppy been getting enough play time and "exercise"? That helps us a lot. My puppy will still jump on my son in the morning when he's first got up on the couch to say good morning, but she's a lot better - I see measurable improvement in her behavior as every week goes on.

I think if your kids are trying to have some quiet time then it's a good time for pen/crate for puppy or at least keeping him away for a while. We've done a lot of keeping them apart up until now and i'd say it's really only the last few weeks we've had her out more with the family that she hasn't been a total doofus mouthing and being a pest. She still is a pest but mostly likes to steal clothes/dish cloths/shoes to engage us in chase. :p

Anyway that's a long answer to the fact that in my (very very limited) experience that the puppy will do so less and less wtih time going on and training and lots of play time! We did SO much play time at this age when we were potty training that she sometimes looks at me when i don't have as much time to play like COME ON MOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Oh another thing we found helpful were the puzzles we put kibble in at this early age. They kept her occupied for a bit!
 

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Yep puppies and small children, its a job in itself.I no longer have any small children about, so when he sees and hears them mine gets overly excited. But I just move on as I don't want him hurting someone else child. Puppies are going to jump, mouth & bite, my st poodle did more of this than any other dog I've ever owned. You could have the children play at the table, or on the couch, but the minute they touch the floor they are fair game for the puppy. It will get better as the dog gets older and the children as well. My husband is 10 years older than me and has been having health issues and balance issues since around the time I got my poodle so I have had to keep him tethered to me whenever my husband is out and about or in his crate. It works though I think it actually slows down the "free time" house training. We will get there though. You pup won't intentionally hurt your children but he can just because puppies are rumbustious and don't think. So keep supervising may put a short lead on him so you can grab and correct, if you hv a long lead you have to hang onto it or the puppy will tangle himself and trip and possibly get hurt. Its a ton of work, thats why I don't say to people with small children that it is wise to get a puppy, you really need to have that personality. I sit for a friends children since they were quite small I think when they got their puppy ( a doddle no less) it was running all around biting at the kids. The kids just treated it like it was one of them. They were infant, 2, 5 & 6. The pup was smart enough to go to the door to go out most times and mom really didn't care. Me I was paranoid that the puppy would get hurt or one of the kids. They didn't and today he is a great dog and a big part of their family, but it took 4 years. LOL
 

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Use the tethering technique. Have your puppy tethered on a leash to you when you can’t watch it. Or tie his leash next to you. When you really can’t do either, put him in his crate.

Puppies and young children are hard work and need constant, and I mean constant, supervision.
Totally agree with Dechi on this. Tethering is the way to go. You are in for a ton of work for the next few months--that's just the way it goes with pups and youngsters. I should know, since I raised puppy Frosty and a young Maizie in my home nursery school with mostly 2 year olds!
 

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If you do the work now as suggested above you will reap the benefits for years to come and give your human children a life long love of dogs.
 

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I am in a similar situation as you - since my grandson who is 4 (and his parents) are living with us until their house is ready. Young puppies (especially as mouthy as a Poodle) and young kids are not matches made in heaven. Their energy is strikingly similar so much so that a tantrum of my grandson usually triggers zoomies in my 10 month old mini (he is not stressed by the way by it - it is more like "hey crazy free for all time").
What has worked well is to approach this from the angle of the kids. I have taught my grandson that if he doesn't want the dog's attention to stand up- cross his arms in front of him and turn his back to the dog. This works 100%. Louie immediately redirects and retreats to his place grabs a chewy, goes for a drink of water etc - he really gets it that my grandson currently is not interested. The next thing I taught my grandson is some solid training commands and how to execute them. Louie will listen better to him than just about anybody else. Henry (my grandson) will be quite firm with his Sit - Stay - Down - Off - "Are you ready" = which is a sit before he throws a toy - and he understands well after loads of practice - command and consequence. He is a stickler for the poodle doing is just so (makes a really stern but good dog trainer). Louie will work his little bum off for him and the only reward he gets is his attention and praise. One
"Good boy Louie" carries a lot of weight - the Poodlekid is beaming after one of those. Henry has also developed his own games with him - totally by himself which is a modified retrieve/heel combination that is hilarious to watch. It is very important that everybody has their free space - both kid and dog need their breaks and cannot be overtired/cranky when they interact. It is the wonderful social intelligence of the Poodle (being cued in to human behavior) that makes the relationship between relatively easy.
 

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I am in a similar situation as you - since my grandson who is 4 (and his parents) are living with us until their house is ready. Young puppies (especially as mouthy as a Poodle) and young kids are not matches made in heaven. Their energy is strikingly similar so much so that a tantrum of my grandson usually triggers zoomies in my 10 month old mini (he is not stressed by the way by it - it is more like "hey crazy free for all time").
What has worked well is to approach this from the angle of the kids. I have taught my grandson that if he doesn't want the dog's attention to stand up- cross his arms in front of him and turn his back to the dog. This works 100%. Louie immediately redirects and retreats to his place grabs a chewy, goes for a drink of water etc - he really gets it that my grandson currently is not interested. The next thing I taught my grandson is some solid training commands and how to execute them. Louie will listen better to him than just about anybody else. Henry (my grandson) will be quite firm with his Sit - Stay - Down - Off - "Are you ready" = which is a sit before he throws a toy - and he understands well after loads of practice - command and consequence. He is a stickler for the poodle doing is just so (makes a really stern but good dog trainer). Louie will work his little bum off for him and the only reward he gets is his attention and praise. One
"Good boy Louie" carries a lot of weight - the Poodlekid is beaming after one of those. Henry has also developed his own games with him - totally by himself which is a modified retrieve/heel combination that is hilarious to watch. It is very important that everybody has their free space - both kid and dog need their breaks and cannot be overtired/cranky when they interact. It is the wonderful social intelligence of the Poodle (being cued in to human behavior) that makes the relationship between relatively easy.
Really appreciate this. Our grandson is only 7 months and we will be using your excellent suggestions as Poodle and boy begin interaction

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Totally agree with Dechi on this. Tethering is the way to go. You are in for a ton of work for the next few months--that's just the way it goes with pups and youngsters. I should know, since I raised puppy Frosty and a young Maizie in my home nursery school with mostly 2 year olds!
As always, Zooeysmom, you have good suggestions. Will be using them in the coming year

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Yep puppies and small children, its a job in itself.I no longer have any small children about, so when he sees and hears them mine gets overly excited. But I just move on as I don't want him hurting someone else child. Puppies are going to jump, mouth & bite, my st poodle did more of this than any other dog I've ever owned. You could have the children play at the table, or on the couch, but the minute they touch the floor they are fair game for the puppy. It will get better as the dog gets older and the children as well. My husband is 10 years older than me and has been having health issues and balance issues since around the time I got my poodle so I have had to keep him tethered to me whenever my husband is out and about or in his crate. It works though I think it actually slows down the "free time" house training. We will get there though. You pup won't intentionally hurt your children but he can just because puppies are rumbustious and don't think. So keep supervising may put a short lead on him so you can grab and correct, if you hv a long lead you have to hang onto it or the puppy will tangle himself and trip and possibly get hurt. Its a ton of work, thats why I don't say to people with small children that it is wise to get a puppy, you really need to have that personality. I sit for a friends children since they were quite small I think when they got their puppy ( a doddle no less) it was running all around biting at the kids. The kids just treated it like it was one of them. They were infant, 2, 5 & 6. The pup was smart enough to go to the door to go out most times and mom really didn't care. Me I was paranoid that the puppy would get hurt or one of the kids. They didn't and today he is a great dog and a big part of their family, but it took 4 years. LOL
Wow, this brought back memories! I had a home based business, traveling husband, a13 yr old, a 15 yr old and a 3 yr old - and some spirit of insanity caused me to agree to yet another standard Schnauzer pup, 3rd in a row. THOSE are demon-spawn to train, our 18 month poodle was a dream in comparison. The 3 year old was 25 pounds of feisty fury, every time I turned my back or was on the phone with a client the pup and the toddler were in a biting, hair pulling, slugging skirmish. But when I tried to discipline the dog the child would grab him around the neck and shield him, roaring "Mine!" Dog hit 55 pounds within the year, and it was amazing watching the little girl of half his size casually slugging the big fanged face when dog tried to bully her out of a cookie. Best ever was the day Dog stole a chunk of cheese out of her hand. She pounced on him, sat on his neck, yanked the big fanged jaws open, retrieved the cheese, popped it into her own mouth and cuffed him while bellowing "Mine!"

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Discussion Starter #13
I have told my kids to do the crossing arms and turning their back technique when things are going awry and it has helped immensely. Sometimes I’ve even noticed that my poodle acting a little aggressively or mouthing or whatever means he needs to go out to relieve himself.
 

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That is a hilarious reminiscence Charlie’s Person! Hope your daughter stayed feisty and brave. The statue game is good because poodle puppies feed off of high energy. I wore long sleeves and jeans in self defense, because those needle teeth hurt.
 

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Yes, I am so very proud of my feisty girl. She is a fierce crusader for the rights of hungry, poor, marginalized and disadvantaged people wherever she goes. She just graduated With Distinction from the Honours Food, Agriculture and Resource Economics program at U of Guelph, is currently doing her Masters in Economics on a full scholarship. 'Fraid I'm a proud Momma of a future world changer
That is a hilarious reminiscence Charlie’s Person! Hope your daughter stayed feisty and brave. The statue game is good because poodle puppies feed off of high energy. I wore long sleeves and jeans in self defense, because those needle teeth hurt.
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I have told my kids to do the crossing arms and turning their back technique when things are going awry and it has helped immensely. Sometimes I’ve even noticed that my poodle acting a little aggressively or mouthing or whatever means he needs to go out to relieve himself.
Ok - so next step when you observe this behavior praise the puppy for ignoring them and give him something else to focus him (chewy in his place or even in an open crate). In other words shape the behavior you want when he understands that the kids are not into playing right now. The idea here is not that YOU entertain him now, but that he finds an activity to do instead. I like the chewy on his bed/in crate (open not closed) in the chill out spot of your choice. That should give you 5 minutes of peace until it starts all over again. Also this becomes a thing he will do on his own in the future (grab a toy and chill out)..
 

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I have told my kids to do the crossing arms and turning their back technique when things are going awry and it has helped immensely. Sometimes I’ve even noticed that my poodle acting a little aggressively or mouthing or whatever means he needs to go out to relieve himself.
Forgot to mention - taking him out to pee is something kids can be a valuable ally in. At this point in his training I would still take him out every hour on the hour with an alarm - unless he is asleep - so the kids can learn to take him to his pee spot when the alarm rings. Which means they get to teach him a sit and stay before the door is opened - put on the leash while calmly sitting (going outside is the reward here) - and then go out and pee (treat helps to make that go faster and on command. After they should play a little with him so he doesn't associate peeing with having to go inside immediately.
 

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Moni has made good points about the idea that as training continues the dog will learn to break off the undesired behavior himself and give himself a little time out. When Javelin starts jumping up and not paying attention to training I have generally put him on a down stay to get him to take a moment to collect his head. I used to always have to tell him a really firm "no, stop and lie down." Over time that has worked its way down to stop and down to down to him lying down when I give him the evil eye.
 
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Moni has made good points about the idea that as training continues the dog will learn to break off the undesired behavior himself and give himself a little time out. When Javelin starts jumping up and not paying attention to training I have generally put him on a down stay to get him to take a moment to collect his head. I used to always have to tell him a really firm "no, stop and lie down." Over time that has worked its way down to stop and down to down to him lying down when I give him the evil eye.
Like the Evil Eye. It does work! I also hiss at Charlie. He instantly settles

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