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Hoping for some insight, advice, anything at all at this point - Dublin had a seizure yesterday afternoon and it was one of the scariest things i've ever witnessed concerning my dogs. It came completely out of the blue.

I know next to nothing about seizures except what to do (or not do) during one. How common is it for a three year old, otherwise healthy and active, standard poodle to have them?

He's never had one before. There's nothing "new" in his life (IE dietary, environmental, etc). He was with me at work when it happened, nothing new there either, and i bring him every 3 weeks to brush him out and bathe him so he doesn't tangle up so while he isn't a fan of the process he tolerates it.

He was perfectly fine all morning leading up. And he recovered fine after, though it felt like it took forever. He's seen the vet (was brought there immediately following), was looked over, and had blood drawn, but they basically said it's a wait-and-see thing right now. He might have another one, he might not.

I hate playing this kind of waiting game. It never even crossed my mind to be worried about seizures with him. I know that having one doesn't mean he's suddenly going to start having them regularly but i'm still kinda freaked out - probably over thinking, but any advice or insight would be welcome.
 

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((((HUGS)))) I don't have any experience, I hope he doesn't have another one.
 

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I had a Chihuahua who also had a seizure out of the blue as an adult. I was very worried at first but she had them very rarely, maybe once a year, not even. And besides the fact that it was uncomfortable when it happened, she was back to her old self very quick.

Seizures seem to be more common than people think and unfortunately, the wait and see approach is the only one when they’re not severe enough to warrant medication. Chances are your dog will be fine, live a good life and never need medication. Try to relax, it might never happen again, or very randomly.
 

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I know this sounds odd, but you have little to worry about. Scary of course, 'specially the first, but seizures are not fatal, never fatal. And no observable ill effects. Tonka and I have been dealing with them for years. As have others in this forum.

His vet was reluctant to take my observations of seizures as diagnostic 'til she saw him go into rictus herself during surgery. At that point, her remedy was Phenobarbital, twice a day... for life.

After about a year of stuffing pills down his throat, always an uncomfortable procedure, I gave it up and went Phenobarb-free. Allowing seizures to run their course... usually one a month or so.

He only seizes at night, usually about 3:00AM. Too late for me to do anything about it. The one time I noticed rictus starting during the day, I got a Phenobarb into him and he settled right down... never did go into a seizure.

So first: Get a video to prove epilepsy to your vet. Phenobarb is a sedative and they are reluctant to prescribe it without proof of seizures.

Secondly: With a supply of the drug, you can then experiment with it yourself. If you can sneak it into Dublin on a regular basis, you have no problem. Go with the twice-a-day plan.

Forcing it into him is another kettle of fish. Do whatever seems to work for you.

And for goodness sake, dog-proof your home for the post ictal phase. AKA the 'stupid phase' when they're crashing about the house, bouncing off walls and doors.

Best of luck, hon. It looks scary as heck, but it's not.
 

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Hoping for some insight, advice, anything at all at this point - Dublin had a seizure yesterday afternoon and it was one of the scariest things i've ever witnessed concerning my dogs. It came completely out of the blue.

I know next to nothing about seizures except what to do (or not do) during one. How common is it for a three year old, otherwise healthy and active, standard poodle to have them?

He's never had one before. There's nothing "new" in his life (IE dietary, environmental, etc). He was with me at work when it happened, nothing new there either, and i bring him every 3 weeks to brush him out and bathe him so he doesn't tangle up so while he isn't a fan of the process he tolerates it.

He was perfectly fine all morning leading up. And he recovered fine after, though it felt like it took forever. He's seen the vet (was brought there immediately following), was looked over, and had blood drawn, but they basically said it's a wait-and-see thing right now. He might have another one, he might not.

I hate playing this kind of waiting game. It never even crossed my mind to be worried about seizures with him. I know that having one doesn't mean he's suddenly going to start having them regularly but i'm still kinda freaked out - probably over thinking, but any advice or insight would be welcome.
Hugs to you and Dublin!! One PF member I hope will add into this conversation because she has experience with this.

Norman, my now 8 month old SPoo had a very minor seizure about a month or so back. Very scary and just pure confusion went through my mind. I was worried it was his flea and tick medicine, but it was not after further investigation. Many sleepless nights. To this day I still check on him when he has night-terrors (kicking) just to make sure its not a seizure.

To this day, I still do not know what happened. Called 2-3 vets and got their advice. The overall conclusion was this was just a spark in his brain. There really sometimes is no direct cause and this was Norman's case.

As for you, depending on how "intense" it was, I would have Dublin looked at though there are many tests that can be done, but that is if you want this to be done to your dog. If there are more in the future, they will have more answers and plans for you.

As hard as it'll be, it is best to stay calm when it happens (if it every happens again). Dont allow anyone near Dublin, especially animals because the dog suffering from a seizure may react to the scary feeling. I researched this tons and I think you should just look into what your dog has been doing. Flea/tick meds, food recalls, soaps, conditioners, toothpaste, etc.

From the link below "If these tests are normal and there is no exposure to poison or recent trauma, further diagnostics may be recommended, depending on the severity and frequency of the seizures. Occasional seizures (less frequently than once a month) are not as worrisome, but they can become more frequent or more severe. In this instance, a spinal fluid analysis may be performed."

They can happen just due to the brain having a fit. Take Dublin to the vet or call them and ask their opinion. As far as starting tons of tests, that is up to you. I did not get Norman tested because I trusted his vet who knows him well. Norman is a happy and healthy pup with no history of anything or genetic issues.

https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/seizures-general-for-dogs

Good luck! Hugs hugs hugs!!
 

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While it's true that some dogs can have occasional seizures with no ill effects, that is certainly not always true. In Countryboy's case he is lucky enough to have some predictability and can manage with the Phenobarb on an as- needed basis.
I don't mean to scare anyone but yes seizures can be a big deal and even fatal. I have seen fatal seizures (generally when the seizure does not stop and/or is untreated). I have seen dogs that had their neurological function (brain) affected by a grand mal seizure and never be the same afterwards. I know a dog that was on seizure medication but still had break-through seizures, and after each one had less mental awareness return afterward.
On the other hand, I also know of dogs that had a single seizure and then nothing for months, years, or ever again (at least to the owner's knowledge). And many dogs who maintain on seizure meds for years with few or no seizures.
I know that at this stage, where you have seen a single seizure and are just waiting to see what happens next, is excruciating and anxious. Unfortunately there is just no way to know what comes next. Yes, an otherwise healthy adult dog can have a single seizure... Or develop idiopathic seizures (unknown cause)... Or sometimes even have a tumour that causes seizures.
I'm definitely hoping in your case that this is a one-time situation!
 

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It's interesting to hear about all those damaging seizure you have seen, Starvt. You must have some fairly extensive experience with Epilepsy.

It will be interesting to have you here. To the best of my knowledge, even here, in PF, we've not heard that before.
 

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Yes, I am a vet tech, nearly 20 years experience, most of that in 24 hour clinics so we see a lot of emergencies even though we are not technically an emerg clinic.
 

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Seizures in toys and minis can be due to hypoglycemia, but I doubt that is likely to be the cause in a standard.

In this day and age dogs are subjected to many toxic substances that people deem safe. Dogs are closer to the floor and they sniff everything, so they can be affected by things like carpet cleaners and poisons used for mice, roaches, etc. They are also likely to chew on things that are poisonous to them.

On the lighter side, I once had a miniature poodle who had what I thought was a hypoglycemic seizure. I picked her up and gave her some Karo syrup and the seizure ended. From then on she would fake a seizure whenever she was angry about something. The usual trigger was my taking another dog for a car ride and not taking her. I "cured" her by simply picking her up without comment and popping her in her crate, thus not rewarding the seizure. It's amazing how clever poodles are!
 

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One of the worst ones though was a vet tech I work with, rescued a standard poodle with known epilepsy. Over the two years she had the dog, the meds kept needing to be increased and/or changed. The dog fell down stairs, and took days to recover from each seizure. She also bloated after a seizure which required a very dangerous (for her) surgery. She was an older dog though- 7 when adopted- which of course increased her risk factors.
 

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Buck had two seizures, scary as hell. We took him to a vet neurologist, and he has not had a single seizure, since he has been on Levetiracetam, the generic of Keppra. I am so glad we have pet insurance. I credit DH for insisting we see a specialist, and not wait and see on number of seizures. He happened to hear a local NPR panel of vets, asking for call in questions, and was told that seizures were not benign events for the brain, never mind the physical safety of dog and owners.
 

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We had a standard who had a few seizures. He had a work up after the first seizure, but there was nothing found. He had such rare seizures that he never took any medication. My aunt has a golden retriever who has many seizures but does well on medication.
 
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