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My 5# poodle was diagnosed last year, by the dentist!, with a Grade 6 heart murmur. He started her on 0.4 ml Furosemide, 1/2 Vetmedin, & Enaparil. She didn’t tolerate the Enaparil well & became very jumpy. 1-year later she is on 0.5 Furosemide, Benasparil, Vetmedin and she just started Spirotocil (another diuretic). She recently had ascites & presented w/a hematoma on her chest. I was wondering if any one had a similar experience.
 

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Welcome to Poodle Forum. I'm sorry to hear your poodle's been struggling with this.

I wish I had more to offer, but we never had a chance to treat Gracie's heart murmur. It progressed so quickly, no one realized it had gotten worse until we rushed her to the emergency vet when she was struggling to breathe. It sounds like your girl's condition is being better managed.

I hope others can offer their experiences to help guide and support you.
 

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Thanks. I do think she is being well managed, actually saved by all the medications. As I read through these threads, I join you in telling every poodle pet owner to pay attention to the teeth. I’ve had 5 toy poodles, this 13 year old being my last of that group and I’ve had Vets treat for prolapsed trachea and cancer but never teeth. And now, I know it was always the teeth that did them in!
 

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Thanks. I do think she is being well managed, actually saved by all the medications. As I read through these threads, I join you in telling every poodle pet owner to pay attention to the teeth. I’ve had 5 toy poodles, this 13 year old being my last of that group and I’ve had Vets treat for prolapsed trachea and cancer but never teeth. And now, I know it was always the teeth that did them in!
This just broke my heart a bit, because when the emergency vet weighed in on whether or not to euthanize Gracie, he did point out how bad her teeth were. We'd known this, but she couldn't go under to have them cleaned up again because her overall health had gotten so bad. It was a real catch 22.

I think it's important to be aggressive with extractions as our pups age. There's only so much you can do to stay on top of it, and they suffer so quietly. Gracie had a bunch pulled a couple of years previous, and if I could go back in time, I'd have had them all pulled.

Sending hugs to you and your little girl.
 

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Actually it isn't just extractions. At the Melbourne Animal Hospital in Florida, the Vet Dentist I methas a 13-year old toy poodle who has no dental issues ….he is a dentist. So I think it is possible to keep their teeth clean, but its hard. He said he anesthesized her 3 times for thorough cleanings but brushed her teeth twice a day! My Vet here on Long Island, NY was suppose to clean her teeth when she was spay but kind of laughed it off that she removed one tooth but the rest were a lost cause. I didn't understand then. It makes me angry that I thought I was paying for a dental cleaning and the severity was ignored. The teeth gave her the heart disease!
 

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There's definitely a lot we can do to support their dental health. But when it's severe/untreatable, I see no reason to be conservative with extractions. Gracie would have loved a wet food diet. :)

Sending best wishes to you and your little one.
 

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We lost our Noel to CHF. In her case, it really wasn't tied to her teeth, She'd had a few extractions over the years, periodic cleanings as long as anesthesia wasn't a concern, and she didn't really have gum disease.

A lot of people aren't aware that just like with humans, there is a connection between heart disease and gum disease and poor dental health. The link isn't fully understood but there is a connection.

I'm saying this hoping it might help you to know that while dental care is very important and may be associated with heart disease, it's possible that the heart disease was something that was out of your control. Heart disease can be genetic, also like humans.

No one would doubt that you both gave your beloved companions all your love and the best care possible. Some things are just beyond us to heal.
 
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