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Old 11-08-2009, 09:09 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default I'm adopting a mini poodle puppy :-) ADVICE PLS!!!

Hello all! So I will be adopting my first poodle puppy in a few weeks from West Coast Poodles. Have you heard of them? She will be a black mini/toy mix and will be my first puppy as I am a 22 yr. old college student so I am just a little nervous. I am looking for advise for a first time owner on training, feeding, basic care and anything particularly important to poodle owners. Any advice on grooming (I've heard not to ever cut the top knot so it can grow out), what to ask for at the groomers, etc. because I have never taken a dog to the groomers before.

Growing up we always rescued dogs from the Humane Society so I have not had the experience of owning a puppy before. I have plenty of time to tend to her with school only on mondays and wednesdays, and want to be active with her. Know of any good beaches or parks in Los Angeles? Do I need to take her to an obedience class? When is the first vet visit?

Thanks so much in advance!!!
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Old 11-08-2009, 09:24 PM   #2 (permalink)
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You should definately do some reading on this forum about responsible breeding, grooming etc! There's tons of useful info, including this post:
https://www.poodleforum.com/showthread.php?t=3238

Also, one little pet peeve of mine: you are buying a dog, not "adopting." Saying that you are adopting a dog from breeder takes away from those who have truly adopted a homeless dog. I don't mean to offend and I hope that as someone who has adopted in the past, you can appreciate what I'm saying. I have an adopted dog, a purchased dog and am hoping to buy another from breeder sometime next year. I'm have no problem w/ buying from responsible breeder, but I like to call it what it is.
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Old 11-08-2009, 09:51 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Harley Chick, thanks for your non-advice. I have actually done my research on breeders in my area and have found a reputable one that I trust. Please keep your "pet peeves" to yourself. I came here for advise, not a lecture. I am reading The Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete right now who refer to obtaining a dog as "adopting" because I am adopting a member of my family, I am not simply buying an animal as a product from a manufacturer. It's not about the money so don't make it about that, it is about a special relationship with one of these amazing creatures. Don't be so quick to judge as I am sure this judgement comes from preconceived notions about young people.

If anyone has any practical ADVICE, I would still appreciate it
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Old 11-08-2009, 09:57 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Well, there's a lot of adjustment time that goes on when you bring home a new puppy. He or she will miss it's littermates and as I've found out, will not eat eagerly or even regularly for the first couple of weeks. Just be persistant, especially since you are getting a toy, and offer food 3 times a day in different ways until you find the one that works for your puppy. Try getting the puppy on a good schedule for potty time. Like wake up potty, feed 30 mins later potty, playtime (depending on the age you can increase it) potty, crate time (or whatever form of confinement you are going to do to teach house training). There's a lot you just learn by doing and making mistakes actually. Making mistakes is part of the learning process and it's totally normal. Don't expect to do everything right. It's almost like bringing home a baby but this one needs chew toys and there are no diapers. You still will have to get up in the middle of the night and there are always worries.

Read your book and ask lots of questions, you'll do fine.
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Old 11-08-2009, 10:02 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I'm sorry you took that so wrong. Why did you ask if anyone had heard about the breeder, if you have your mind made up? Even if you found my pet peeve offensive (I think you're being too sensitive), you should check out the link I posted. I wouldn't call that thread "non-advice."

All dogs should be members of the family no matter where they came from, but you are buying a dog. You aren't getting a homeless dog from a shelter, who might otherwise be PTS. You are getting a dog from a breeder, who chose to bring them into this world. "Adoption" implies that you got a dog from a shelter or rescue, and to say the you adopted when you really bought, is misleading. I realize that's not what you intended, so I thought I would give you a heads up.
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Old 11-09-2009, 05:22 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calsun182 View Post
Harley Chick, thanks for your non-advice. I have actually done my research on breeders in my area and have found a reputable one that I trust. Please keep your "pet peeves" to yourself. I came here for advise, not a lecture. I am reading The Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete right now who refer to obtaining a dog as "adopting" because I am adopting a member of my family, I am not simply buying an animal as a product from a manufacturer. It's not about the money so don't make it about that, it is about a special relationship with one of these amazing creatures. Don't be so quick to judge as I am sure this judgement comes from preconceived notions about young people.

If anyone has any practical ADVICE, I would still appreciate it
I would recommend that you NOT get a dog at this stage of your life. A puppy really ties you down. When your friends are going out after work, you will have to be rushing home to be with your dog. When your friends are traveling for the weekend, you will be staying home with the dog. It can be very difficult to rental housing even with a small dog.

But, since you are going to let that practical advice go in one ear and out the other, I'll give you some puppy tips:

Crate train. A puppy can be in a crate during the day for as many hours as it is month old + 1. That means your puppy can be in a crate for 3 hours before it has to be let out to potty. You are going to have to work your school schedule around this or get someone to let the dog out for you.

Do not use piddle pads. They retard house training. Use crating/confining and the gradual increase of space to house train. Keep your puppy on hard surfaces or you are going ruin your carpet.

Sign up for Puppy Kindergarten. After your pup has had their second set of vaccines (usually around age 12-14 weeks) you can go a puppy socialization class.

DO NOT TREAT YOUR PUPPY LIKE A LIVING STUFFED ANIMAL. This is the biggest mistake Toy/Mini owners make. DO NOT CARRY YOUR PUPPY AROUND. Your puppy is not a baby or a purse accessory. Put it on the floor, treat it like a dog and teach it to stand on its own 4 feet.

Finally.... and you MUST listen to this advice. Mini and Toy poodles have a genetic eye condition that causes blindness. If your puppy gets two copies of the gene, IT WILL GO BLIND. This usually starts happening around age 5 and there is nothing you can do to stop this. The good news is that there is a test for the gene so a Mini/ Toy breeder will never have to produce a blind dog again. If this breeder has not done the testing (she must show you evidence of testing... do not take her word for it) then you must not buy this puppy. Breeders should also check breeding stock for Luxating Patellas and Legg-Calve Perthes but these things are fixable in a puppy. In California, fixing it should cost around $6000.

RE: adoption... I agree. I absolutely despise the term "adoption" when people are buying a dog. You are buying a puppy from a breeder who has a button on her web site that says ORDERING. From that page:

To place an order,or request information, simply send an E-mail request to us or call us . Marsi will respond within 48 to 72 hours or hopefully less. We get asked often to provide a list of available puppies, and have discovered that maintaining an up to the minute list is impossible due to sales demands.

Blah. Sounds more like a catalog than a conscientious breeder.
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:14 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I agree that the term "adoption" confused me at first also...but kudos to you calsun 182 for joining this forum to get more information on your new pup. They do tie you down but dogs need a loving responsible owner which seems you will be no matter what your age. Poodles are wonderful-their only con is the amount of money and/or work their coats take to keep them healthy and attractive. I learned my lesson in that if you do choose to find a groomer, go to this site: www.nationaldoggroomers.com to find a certified groomer in your area. Go check out the facility and get references before taking your dog in. Also interview vets in your area and go online to Insider Pages (your local ones) to see if you can read reviews. Find good help at the beginning and you will keep a trusting long relationship with these people. Good luck!
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:19 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Just an addition-as I researched so many breeders this past year. West Coast Poodles was one that I actually contacted but decided against as the breeder was going to charge more for a red poodle depending on its shade of red. It was a put-off for me.
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:27 AM   #9 (permalink)
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I managed a humane society in my hometown for four years and agree that the term "adoption" gives the connotation of "rescuing" from a humane society or shelter... My first three dogs were adopted from the shelter I managed. My new puppy is technically purchased, but I don't like that word either so I've been using the words "obtained", "procured", "acquired", etc... I know it's all semantics, but when it comes to our new family members we do (say) what feels right!

As far as young people owning dogs, my daughter "procured" her standard poodle puppy when she was 18 years old. The difference between Katy and many other young adults is that she has her dad and me to step in if she needs us to.

She's still living at home for now but hopes to find a place of her own someday soon. She's going to do everything possible to take her dog with her, but she also knows that we will never allow Meau to be "homeless" and she can stay with us if necessary... not all young adults have that safety net and I can attest to the fact that a lot of the dogs which were surrendered to our shelter came from young people whose lives changed and they couldn't keep their pets. Lives change a lot when you're young... not so much for us "forty-somethings" with an owned home and a fenced yard (although never say never!!)

Wishing you the best with your new family member Calsun182!! Puppies are a lot of work, a lot of commitment, a lot of responsibility, and also a lot of fun and fullfillment! If you can read all the comments you get here and remember that all the people on here love our dogs and just want the best for them no matter what - keeping in mind that no one really knows your situation and you can take or leave comments as you choose - you'll do fine! Don't take anything personally since no one knows you personally, and it's really hard to try to explain the nuances of our personalities/home life/experiences/lack of experiences/etc to people who don't know us from Adam!!

Good luck and best wishes!!
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Old 11-09-2009, 03:15 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbrand View Post
I would recommend that you NOT get a dog at this stage of your life. A puppy really ties you down. When your friends are going out after work, you will have to be rushing home to be with your dog. When your friends are traveling for the weekend, you will be staying home with the dog. It can be very difficult to rental housing even with a small dog.
I totally understand what cbrand is saying - and she definitely has a valid point. I see alot of my friends buy dogs on a whim, and end up neglecting them, or giving them away. Lucky for me, my family loves dogs and would be willing to take my pup in if it gets overwhelming for me.

I just graduated from college and am working, age 22, and I acquired my mini 2 months ago, and since then... whenever I go out with my friends i always have to be home early because my pup has separation anxiety, needs to be taken to the bathroom, etc etc. I literally never go to happy hour with my coworkers because I rush home to take him out..and my life has suddenly become way less...dynamic. Clubbing/bar scenes/random vacations and road trips are rarely options anymore. In addition, my boyfriend and I trade off duties, which makes it a lot more manageable - but even so it is very tiring! So much sacrifice..but also very rewarding - but I'm sure you know that since you've had dogs in the past. The times I'm kept at home I save a lot of money, but then again..all that money goes towards taking care of the dog! lol.

I don't have much advice for you since I'm a new owner myself, but I look forward to hearing about your new experiences with your mini! You seem to be in a similar boat as me!
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